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  • September 01, 2022
    Meet Research Grant Recipient: Melanie Martinez
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  • August 24, 2022
    Meet Research Grant Recipient: Louis-Philippe Bernier, PhD
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  • August 16, 2022
    Meet Research Grant Recipient: Umeshkumar Athiraman, MD, MBBS
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  • August 11, 2022
    Meet Research Grant Recipient: Joseph Antonios, MD, PhD
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  • June 02, 2022
    Do Brain Aneurysms Run in Families?
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  • June 03, 2022
    The Story Behind Her Success: Christine Buckley
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  • March 14, 2022
    Stroke and Aneurysm: What Is The Difference?
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  • November 18, 2021
    AI Technology to Find, Track and Treat Aneurysms
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  • June 18, 2021
    California Woman Describes Experience of Brain Aneurysm
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  • March 16, 2021
    UM Neurosurgeon Receives $3 Million NIH Grant for Innovative Research on Aneurysms
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In My Area

Support groups
  • AdventHealth Brain Aneurysm Support Group

    Winter Park, FL

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  • Baltimore Brain Aneurysm Foundation Support Group

    Lutherville-Timonium, MD

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  • Bay Area Aneurysm and Vascular Malformation Support Group

    San Francisco, CA

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  • October 22, 2020
  • BAF
  • Technology

LLNL develops first-ever living, 3D-bioprinted aneurysm to test surgical treatments

Brain aneurysms affect about one in every 50 Americans and can lead to serious medical emergencies, including stroke, brain damage and death if they burst. Existing treatment options are limited and often invasive, and surgical outcomes can vary widely from person to person.

But medical practitioners may be able to improve existing treatment methods and develop new personalized ones, thanks to researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and their outside collaborators. The team, which includes scientists at Duke University and Texas A&M, has become the first to produce a living, bioprinted aneurysm outside of the human body, perform a medical procedure on it, and observe it respond and heal as it would in an actual human brain.

Read more here

By Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory



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